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Shooting Lead in a 10mm


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#21 OFFLINE   Jack Ryan

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Posted Mar. 24 2013 - 08:55 PM

If I wanted to shoot short and weak bullets I'd have bought one in S&W caliber. I bought a 10mm, I shoot 10mm amo in it and I shoot a lot of lead in every center fire handgun caliber I own.




#22 OFFLINE   Old Navy

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Posted Mar. 25 2013 - 06:38 AM

I shoot my 170 gr SWC at about 1150fps in my Dan Wesson RZ10, but it's my only 10mm auto I own with ramped barrel. The DE doesn't feed the HC L/SWC very well and will jam at better then 50% ratio. Never had a fail to feed in the DW, but I don't shoot the DW much any more till the kids get little old and can chase empties. Until then the DW  revolvers will get shot more, specially the 22LR's and 357 Magnum's, the 44 magnum's have gotten pricey to plink with even with me reloading. Funny thing is I still shoot a tighter group with the 44's vs 357 and the DW's are easy on the hand to shoot due to all the steel in the 5lb plus gun's. Weight depends on which barrel I'm shooting, 2.5" up to 10" barrels varies recoil quite a bit.  


Edited by Old Navy, Mar. 25 2013 - 06:44 AM.



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#23 OFFLINE   Peashooter

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Posted Apr. 14 2013 - 09:04 AM

I said why. They were designed from the ground up as a 10mm, not as a .45 altered to shoot 10mm. These should handle the recoils of stiff loads a lot better. Remember all the slides cracking on EAA Witnesses? Probably because they were NOT designed as a 10mm originally.

 

  The Witness with the New and un-improved round top slide can't handle a 40 S&W load without cracking let alone a 10MM. 




#24 OFFLINE   gandog56

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Posted Apr. 14 2013 - 03:24 PM

Wouln't know. My Dan Wesson Razorback only came out in a 10mm, so I assumed it was designed fot full 10mm pressures. My Custom Build Fusion Firearms Long Slide Traditional Hunter looks like it only comes in a 10mm package. It certainly SEEMS stought enough.




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#25 OFFLINE   Old Navy

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Posted Oct. 05 2013 - 08:04 AM

My two RZ's on the left a 38 Super and on the right a 10mm, both buffalo horn grips.

 

DSC_0080.jpg

 




#26 OFFLINE   BruceM

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Posted Oct. 27 2013 - 08:13 PM

I said why. They were designed from the ground up as a 10mm, not as a .45 altered to shoot 10mm.

 

OK. You still did say how they were different, only that they were. Actually, they operate exactly the same way. They are Browning tilting barrel recoil operated type autoloading pistols which will accept the same parts as any other 1911 pistol with a similar amount of fitting.

 

 

The firing cycle (action timing)for all 1911 pistols is based on the .45 ACP cartridge including the one mentioned the barrel lugs, lug recesses in the slide, link pins, swinging link, etc. are all essentially similar to any other 1911 and operate the same way.. Attempts to change that timing usually involve using stronger recoil springs, adding mass to the slide, adding a square bottom firing pin stop and all combinations of the aforementioned. They are all bandaid type work arounds. The timing actually needs to be retarded the way Peter stall did it with the Linkless upper and the way Paul Leibenberg did on the Centimeter 1911's and the 4006 prototypes he built for Smith & Wesson after their engineers originally said it could not be done. They changed the camming to retard the actions opening based on the energy the 10mm (or 40 S&W) produces during firing. Anyway, everything needs to slow down so that the chamber pressure is lower when the action starts to open and the way to do that correctly is changing some of the basic mechanics a little bit. That seems to take a little too much time however, especially in todays world of instant gratification.

 

Bruce


Edited by BruceM, Nov. 04 2013 - 11:32 PM.



#27 OFFLINE   puke

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Posted Feb. 04 2017 - 05:24 PM

S


Any gun will go kaboom if you shoot enough lead w/o cleaning before switching to to jacketed ammo. The design of pologonal rifling was to grip the bullet w/o shaving off so much lead and having bullet deformation or copper if used with jacketed ammo. So You actually get less lead build up in a Glock factory barrel then standard rifling.

I shot a lot of lead in my Glocks and would never shoot jacketed after 50 rounds w/o a good scrubbing, but knew guys on Glock forum that would shoot several hundred and switch w/o cleaning. But I do the same even with standard rifling.

My opinion is that Glock made that decision as a legal one..or possibly just because they didn't want to field questions, etc.,.. There are many stories of lead being shot in glocks.




#28 OFFLINE   puke

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Posted Feb. 05 2017 - 03:47 PM

Leading problems and kabooms in Glock pistols are direct functions of incorrect sizing and lubrication plus lax maintenance IMO. Cast bullets in my SA Omega do not produce undue leading problems. That said, the polygonal rifling in a Glock is slightly different than that used in my Omega, for instance. Therefore, extra caution must be exercised when using cast bullets in the Glock. The notion that Glock's rifling forms a tighter seal may or may not be true. In view of that possibility, extra care should be exercised during load development as maximum loads which are safe in a DW, MIMber or Colt may, for that reason, be overpressure in a Glock. This just re-inforces my view that top loads (actually all loads) should be developed for individual pistols and the work of other people not  be copied. Lose the notion that load data is a recipe and complete your due dilligence when loading. It's a recipe for you only if you developed it for a particular pistol you own. Nothing more and nothing less. Incidentally, incorrect sizing & lubrication is the main cause of leading and not alloy hardness or lack of same. Bullets can be unnecessarily hard but almost invariably not too hard although a hardness increases, so does the need for exact sizing.

 

Bruce

Here's one for you...or anybody else... I've never gotten a straight answer in many years.  "never copy somebody elses loads"...Does this "somebody else" include Federal? for instance.. Or winchester, etc.,..  

 

Case in point.  The original 357 mag load was 15.3 +/-  (if my memory is correct) grains of 2400...over a gas checked 158 gr. swc. There were no other watered down loads like they have nowadays. I do believe from time to time federal will still publish this (or something close)..even though most other loads are watered down like you can't believe.  Same is true for the 44 mag. and 2400.  Seems to me like there should be a caveat there that if you duplicate factory loads with the same factory components...you are no different than factory except you have the ability to be more (or less) consistent.

 

I do not have a go to load for 10mm yet... So I hope this thread chugs along for quite a while. There sure isn't a lot of info out there...that's for sure...And I no longer live close enough to a range that I can drag my chrony over there every weekend and dial in a nice load.







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