Jump to content
[[Template core/global/global/lkeyWarning does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
[[Template core/global/global/pagination is throwing an error. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]

Recommended Posts

The international road racers are almost as nuts as the international motor cross riders. We would run up to Lauden, NH to watch the annual international road race they had there. It was quite a spectacle that lasted a week. The world class speedsters were something. The out in the breeze high speed is truly amazing considering anything that can go south on the bike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/google does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/stumble does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
On 1/19/2019 at 8:05 PM, towtruck said:

You know I could have scared the pants off that bike rider in my day....except I would have done it in an 18 wheel fuel tanker with a trailer. I totally get the rush. I had a few roads that the right truck would just carve the corners and I could get into a zone and be one with the truck and the road......total rush. I just never did anything over 80 MPH as that was top end. It wasn't so much top end speed but the ability to carve a 25 MPH corner at 60 MPH when empty. I used to carve the Feather River canyon on highway 70 and make my trainee want to get out and walk. Again it wasn't about top speed just carving the road at the vehicles maximum.  I don't have the sharp mind or eyes to do that anymore. 

 

That guy was off the ground in a few places for over 100 yards....that's fast.

It's an old post,  but I used to be just like you. 45mph curves on 58 in Oregon and I'd pass other trucks doing 75. Part of it was knowing the road, part of it was being smooth on the steering wheel

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/google does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/stumble does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
9 hours ago, tommag said:

It's an old post,  but I used to be just like you. 45mph curves on 58 in Oregon and I'd pass other trucks doing 75. Part of it was knowing the road, part of it was being smooth on the steering wheel

 

Yep. A long nose Pete and good suspension I could slide my trailer around corners. It was all about going fast in the corners and keeping everything in my lane that made it fun for me. Driving logging trucks gave me the tools I needed to drive fast, driving fuel trucks when empty was just a blast. The day I realized I needed to stop was when two empty loggers pulled over for me to pass....when a logger gets out of the way of a fuel tanker you know you need to check yourself. 

 

One highway up to my property I still carve with my pickup and equipment trailer....I know that road so well I know right where to be to make every corner.  We had a truck crash up that way a few years ago and the officer I was with did not know the road so I told him what to do....I had him taking 35 mph corners at 75+. He trusted me and just listened to what I told him and we were both in the zone...him driving and me calling speed and which way the corners went. I would get as specific as to tell him where in the lane to be as we entered and exited corners. We came up on traffic and got behind a truck and trailer with one car behind it. I told him where the areas to pass were and as we approached the area I told him not to pass....seeing the road clear ahead he started to pass and just as we got beside the car it changed lanes on top of us taking us into the ditch. We got back on the road, he pulled over the car, and we resumed our travels....he asked me how I knew not to pass at that time.....I told him I was watching the car driver and they never once looked in their mirror. I also told him the driver of the car was a local and knew the road and where to pass.....you learn to spot these things as a professional driver. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/google does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/stumble does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
[[Template core/global/global/pagination is throwing an error. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/google does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
  • [[Template core/front/sharelinks/stumble does not exist. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...
[[Template core/global/global/includeJS is throwing an error. This theme may be out of date. Run the support tool in the AdminCP to restore the default theme.]]