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Recondo 101

Farm or Out and Away Property

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Watching programs that help people see the “real world“ of living out in the too-lies may be helpful. However, that normal, pie in the sky, rose colored glasses business, needs to be replaced by some realistic understanding of what is required to be self sufficient.

 

When you live out, you may not have any close by neighbors, much less repair people that provide dependable service. You must be prepared to do anything and everything for yourself, with the knowledge, the tools, the health and the physical ability to do so. The desire to live out and away, is simply not enough.

 

Water, drinkable, clean water is an absolute necessity,  you can live for many days without food, but water is needed every day. Out and away property rarely has good consistent, electric power or a proper water supply. A potable deep water well may be a necessity, not just desirable. A gas generator may also be a requirement, and should by natural gas or propane to limit maintenance.

 

Besides a long list of needed tools, you must be inventive, because you will be faced with daily problems that you must figure out how to solve all by yourself. Animals rarely solve problems, livestock is especially maintenance intensive. Domestic cattle get into trouble constantly, plus a horned bull or even a cow can be very dangerous as can a stud horse. Knowing animals and animal behavior can save your life. Plus at least basic hunting and survival skills are necessary, not optional.

 

You should know how to build a house or barn from the foundation up, plus be able to do basic repairs of every aspect of the house/barn/well/pumps/fence, etc. Learn how to cut down trees safely and without killing yourself. TV is crazy in tree cutting. Everything you buy or build or own, creates a list of repair and scheduled or unscheduled maintenance. Nothing works forever when being used, nothing. You never have enough shelves, cabinets or room in a shop or barm.

 

Create a buy and build schedule. No piece of raw land, ever, does not need a tractor with usable attachments. A golf cart is a very useful tool if converted to a small truck like vehicle. A sporting clays cart is perfect for farm use. My old 72 volt electric clays cart is easily the most used vehicle on our farm. I converted it for installing fence, seeding, fertilizing, spraying, cleaning, riding/repairing fence and just about every light duty job including daily mail runs and hauling trash.

 

As a surveyor, I laid everything I wanted out to scale then went looking for the property to fit my plan. It took 6 years to find the exact property I wanted. I rode and walked the property with a hand held GPS mapping tool, then talked to the future neighbors, before the purchase. I had to actually see the property to envision every change, every building, then I brought the wife to see it.

 

Do not forget medical services, you will need medical attention sooner or later, make very sure you have at least stabilization within 15 to 30 minutes. Know basic first aid, including CPR. Have a kit and a book on hand.

 

A public access road adjoining the property is best, and any water, pond, lake, etc should be entirely on your property or not at all. Public access onto your property will create unnecessary problems in the future.

 

I have owned this property for near 17 years and I watch TV programs, by satellite, and am not amused by the people that put themselves and their family at risk, without a clue. Know exactly what you are buying and see it, before the money changes hands.

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4 hours ago, Recondo 101 said:

Do not forget medical services, you will need medical attention sooner or later, make very sure you have at least stabilization within 15 to 30 minutes. Know basic first aid, including CPR. Have a kit and a book on hand.

 

 

 

I drove 90-95mph for 30 min lights/siren running to a rancher who called 911 having a heart attack........he waited till calving was done to call 911....went from chest pain to a STEMI by the time we got to him....

 

One rancher was calving and waited 3 days, when he walked into the ER he was knocking on deaths door & another 10 min would have been dead.....

 

One guy drove over a hour to see us, popping a nitro pill when the pain came back & then doing a nebulizer while he drove & he would not let his wife drive......he died in our parking lot......

 

Ranchers are stubborn old fools

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Yep, have had several relatives and friends that literally did nothing, having one attack after another, until it was too late. Very sad.

This house is a, go get in the truck, we are going to the hospital, type house. I had three heart caths just this year and now have 11 stints and am waiting for the multiple bypass surgery, if this crazy virus mess will ease off just long enough to go get bypass surgery and do the 3-5 days, I will get hat and be in the breeze. My heart surgery team is selected and I am just awaiting a, “come on down,” order.

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Reminds me of a good family friend. He walked into the ER telling the receptionist that he was having a heart attack. She looked at him and gave him some paperwork to fill out. He was filling out the paperwork when he went back to the desk and said he was having another heart attack. The lady preceded to tell him to fill out the paperwork and he would be called back shortly. He was filling his paperwork out when he finally passed out. Turns out he had multiple massive heart attacks that should have killed most normal men. He is a true man who could lift the front end of a 3/4 ton truck while we charge the tire.

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I know three old timers that passed away on the farm. One sat under a tree to rest and never woke up, another had a heart attack and drove himself home instead of the hospital, and another that knew something was not right so he went to finish up the days chores and keeled over on the way home. In my old home town it was a 2 hour drive to a real hospital and at least 30 minutes to what was listed as a first aid station. 

 

Full time country folk are tough as nails. These are people that have been stomped half to death by horses, smashed in accidents and just go home and sit in a chair until they heal. My old logging boss got in a truck wreck and went to the hospital in the area. They ran a few tests and took some x-rays and sent him home. He was in pretty bad shape and had a lot more wrong with him than the hospital realized. He got into his easy chair and they could not get him out again. He refused to see another doctor. He stayed in that chair for well over a week before he could get out of it. At 6'4" and 275 pounds nobody else was going to get him up either. 

 

 

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I live in the country but I'm too old to be very far from real medical help. I have more than enough gear to pioneer. To be honest, probably twice too much.  Good to be more or less self sufficient however.

I'm lucky, in my tiny town, the neighbors are great, the pub still has beer and the gas station still has fuel and ice cream.

 

 

Matt 

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1 hour ago, towtruck said:

I know three old timers that passed away on the farm. One sat under a tree to rest and never woke up, another had a heart attack and drove himself home instead of the hospital, and another that knew something was not right so he went to finish up the days chores and keeled over on the way home. In my old home town it was a 2 hour drive to a real hospital and at least 30 minutes to what was listed as a first aid station. 

 

Full time country folk are tough as nails. These are people that have been stomped half to death by horses, smashed in accidents and just go home and sit in a chair until they heal. My old logging boss got in a truck wreck and went to the hospital in the area. They ran a few tests and took some x-rays and sent him home. He was in pretty bad shape and had a lot more wrong with him than the hospital realized. He got into his easy chair and they could not get him out again. He refused to see another doctor. He stayed in that chair for well over a week before he could get out of it. At 6'4" and 275 pounds nobody else was going to get him up either. 

 

 

 

 

When I was in 11th grade was working for a old school farmer from deep in the Missouri backwoods bailing square bales of hay, Fell off of a top bale and sliced my shin open to the bone, we went back to the farm house, poured lots of fresh well water (had a hand pump for drinking water in the yard) ato clean it out, he flipped up the skin and wraped and taped it up so I could drive the tractor the rest of the day :screwloose::screwloose:

 

Still have a really narley scar, but it healed up fine......

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In my neck of the woods, it would have been coal oil..

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It may be hard to remember but TRY : If You or anyone suspects they're having a heart attack , keep them upright and if possible HAVE THEM COUGH . DON'T Lie down !!.

Get Medical treatment ASAP . Believe it or not coughing can actually help  jump start cardiac rhythm in some cases . Now cardiac arrest is a totally different animal ,as normally person is unconscious or comatose !.  Then it's HANDS ON CHEST and pump , do CPR try for  #65-85 Pulses per minute  . You may just save someone's life :thumb:

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If you're going to be more than 10-15 minutes from EMS help (regularly), then I would suggest in taking (along with everyone else in your household) primary first aid, CPR, and AED classes. Buy an AED, and keep it handy, especially if there are older folks around. 

 

If you suspect you or another person is having a cardiac event, take an aspirin (chew up an adult tablet or two), as it may maintain or restore blood flow to the heart. GET THEM TO EMS right away, without waiting for life's conveniences. That's how people die. A large percentage of people don't survive long enough to hit the floor with their first heart attack, if you're still breathing and there's any possibility your heart is involved, GET TO A HOSPITAL or EMS IMMEDIATELY. There are dozens of things we can deal with, blood, broken bones, bites, whatever. But a heart issue that isn't addressed in time can and will kill you. 

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Yep, when we bought this place, there was a rural, small town hospital, right across the state line. Not a great hospital, but a place to get stabilized before transport, with doctors and nurses present. Obozo in his misguided attempt to economize and concentrate medical care, closed many rural hospitals, by order or draconian rules. The result was not better care, it was in fact no care. Intelligence is no replacement for common sense.

The little town strattles the state line. A state line can represent a myriad of problems for delivered medical care or any first response team. So we have a recently set up emergency aid building established by our county, located in the Sherrif’s sub station parking lot and the fire dept with EMTs and an ambulance is next door, it is about 4 miles from us and about 3/4 mile from the state line. This is an example of knowing where, and what is available, plus keeping up with changes. Not only do I know what group and from where, responds to what, my wife and I actually went and met them, face to face, described the property, ponds for snorkel use, the house plus house color and gave them the gate combination code. The 6 Ps.

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